Horrible One-Sided Trade For The Ottawa Senators

It was not a happy Hockey Day In Canada for the Ottawa Senators. On the very day that the Senators and their prized acquisition, Matt Duchene blew yet another two goal league to arch-rival, Toronto, Duchene’s old team, the Colorado Avalanche won their ninth straight game, putting themselves in a playoff position, while the Senators drop further away out of sight.

Ottawa must still be reeling from the shock. Nobody would have predicted such a one-sided trade. What’s even more horrible is that Ottawa was supposed to be the big winner. To recap: Ottawa got Duchene from Colorado in return for a bunch of players and at the same time let Kyle Turris go to Nashville. To rub it in, Nashville is now leading their division and Turris has made a significant contribution, while the Senators have got virtually nothing from Duchene.

Getting Duchene made sense for Ottawa. Last year in the playoffs they solidly defeated a tough Boston Bruins team and then pulled off one of the two major upsets of the Stanley Cup tournament by ousting the New York Rangers. The Senators weren’t through either. They proved to be Stanley Cup Champion Pittsburgh Penguins toughest opponent, going toe to toe with them for the maximum seven games and only losing in double overtime. To General Manager Pierre Dorion, the difference in that series was that the Penguins had two superstar players at forward, Sydney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin, arguably the best player in the world and the best European player in the world. Dorion figured that if he could acquire a superstar forward of his own, it would be the final piece of the puzzle that would put Ottawa past Pittsburgh and give them a Stanley Cup to match their recent Grey Cup. Dorion was not alone in such thinking. Many fans, coaches, media, other general managers, etc. believed it too.

So with the best will in the world, Dorion looked around for a superstar forward. The biggest prize available seemed to be Matt Duchene who was rumored to be available for the right price. In a way, Colorado was trying to imitate the Pittsburgh formula for building a Stanley Cup champion, by molding a team around two superstar forwards, Matt Duchene and Nathan MacKinnon. But the Pittsburgh formula was not working in Denver and the Avalanche finished near the bottom of the standings last year. It was rumored that Avalanche General Manager Joe Sakic had made Duchene – significantly not MacKinnon – available for a trade.

Sakic obviously made a sound assessment of his club. As things would turn out he picked the right source for the “cancer” on the team and then kept the result close to the chest. His accurate assessment qualifies him to being named this year’s top General Manager of the NHL, in conjunction with Las Vegas General Manager George McPhee. One only has to compare the result of Sakic’s diagnosis with that of Montreal Canadiens General Manager Marc Bergevin who targeted P.K. Subban as the scapegoat for Montreal missing the playoffs two years  ago and shipped him to – a potential deja vu for Dorion – Nashville. And today, both Ottawa and Montreal are out of the playoffs by a wide margin while the Nashville Predators and Colorado Avalanche soar.

So without divulging the reason for his assessment, Sakic held out until he got what he believed was the right equivalent for Duchene and then let him go to Ottawa. Nobody flinched at the move. As an added incentive, getting Duchene would seem to be a way for Ottawa Senator owner, Eugene Melnyk to tell local Ottawa politicians, “We’re serious about winning the Stanley Cup. Now provide funds for building a new arena.”

For Duchene, perhaps it meant he was now going to be released from playing under the shadow of MacKinnon and be given his own team to lead. But instead of responding to the challenge, Duchene has failed to produce and Ottawa, once so close it seemed to the Stanley Cup now finds itself in the dregs of the league. Nobody would have predicted this. It was supposed to be a win-win-win trade for every team. Instead Ottawa stands fleeced.

Who do you blame? How can you blame coach Guy Boucher who got his team to respond so well in the playoffs last year and until Duchene appeared, had the Senators in playoff contention this year? Obviously Dorion is going to get a lot of blame, but other NHL general managers, coaches, media, fans too numerous to count, believed in Duchene too. Duchene was coveted by a lot of teams. This trade seems to prove Sakic’s worth as a general manager, rather than any deficiency by Pierre Dorion. And owner Melnyk approved the trade for the arena reasons listed above. There have been no further moves since the trade by Ottawa. Probably the results have left the owner, general manager, coach and the rest of the team in shock, stunned.

As to why Duchene has proven to be not what he was projected to be, there you have me. Obviously I am not close to the Senators. I am not acquainted with Duchene personally so I cannot accurately access why he failed to respond in his new environment. Obviously Sakic and the Avalanche management had come to believe that he was not what he was projected to be and wanted him gone and carefully and wisely kept it to themselves. They were lying in wait, ready to take advantage when any inquiring general manager like Pierre Dorion came calling.

So most of the blame clearly falls on Duchene. A lot of people are going to be refining their judgment and assessments about him. There is no way Ottawa is going to get what they paid for if they try to trade him. If he became a free agent, there is no way he is going to command the salary he once seemed to merit. Unless he turns things around, his value on the NHL market will take a severe drop.

Unless Duchene becomes what he was projected to be, this trade will become one of the worst or best in NHL history, depending on who you are cheering for. Not even the Gretzky trade of 1988 was so one-sided. Edmonton won one more Stanley Cup without Gretzky, while he failed to take the Los Angeles Kings to the Stanley Cup. So far, a more accurate trade to compare this one to was the one in which the Chicago Blackhawks traded Phil Esposito to the Boston Bruins. Esposito subsequently became the NHL scoring champion and Boston won two Stanley Cups while Chicago had to wait over 40 years until the days of Jonathan Toews to win the Cup again.

Right now it is a nightmare to play for or be part of the ownership, management, and coaching staff of the Ottawa Senators. A logical trade, one that most people might have predicted that Ottawa would win has blown up to catastrophic proportions. The team that seemed one step away from the Stanley Cup now has plunged into the depths of the NHL. And still worse, from Duchene’s point of view, they can accurately name the date of when it started to occur.

 

Hidden Meaning Of Duchene Trade For Ottawa: Build Us A New Arena

The acquisition of Matt Duchene by Ottawa probably means more than just strengthening a mediocre attack and taking another step toward the Stanley Cup. The Senators who have been pressing for a new downtown arena to be built for quite sometime now, just took another step to get public opinion on their side and sway reluctant governments be they municipal, provincial, and federal to pledge public funds for such a project. In effect they are saying, “You won a Grey Cup when you rebuilt Lansdowne Park. If you want a Stanley Cup to go along with it, build us a new downtown arena. Trading for Matt Duchene shows us to be sincere.”

The owner of the Senators, Eugene Melnyk believes that the current arena, located in the suburb of Kanata is too far away to lure fans consistently and has his eyes set on developing a sizable piece of land in downtown Ottawa. While the new arena would be the centerpiece of such development, there will be other significant construction built around it, just like the recent development around the new Edmonton arena. So far, existing negotiations have not encountered the hostility and opposition that proposed new arenas in Phoenix and Calgary have encountered. There is a good chance that this project will get off the ground and become reality.

Trading for Matt Duchene spurs things along. Being a step closer to the Stanley Cup after last year’s run to the Eastern Conference Final makes things more tempting for the fans and puts pressure on the authorities of the various governments to give in to popular opinion. This gambit has been tried before successfully in Pittsburgh. There was hesitation and opposition to building their current arena until the owners using the bait of having Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin and the prospect of losing them because the old arena would not generate the funds to afford the salaries of a championship team, finally persuaded authorities that a new arena should be built. Ground was broken in 2008; the Penguins won the Cup next year and have won two more in recent years. Championship teams mean new arenas or at least improvements.

Duchene is the marquee player on offence to go with Erik Karlsson and Craig Anderson on defense. He will sell more tickets and generate more interest in the team. Ottawa came close once before since getting their team back to winning the Stanley Cup with Daniel Alfredsson as the leader and main attraction. The recent Grey Cup victory of the Ottawa Redblacks will also sway public opinion and the authorities to give a favorable response for public funding.

Ottawa wants to win it all now. They want their star forward. They want the Stanley Cup. They want larger attendance and that means a new arena.

 

Duchene Trade: 3 Different Goals For 3 Different Teams

It took time but the Ottawa Senators finally found a way to make the Colorado Avalanche part with Matt Duchene. Duchene had been promised a trade by Colorado General Manager Joe Sakic long ago and despite Duchene’s good work in the early part of the season and despite Duchene’s fondness for both Denver and the Avalanche organization, both sides never changed their minds and when a suitable trade became available, Sakic consummated it.

Ottawa did not have enough on its own to satisfy Sakic so Nashville got in on the act by sending the Avalanche the missing pieces and receiving Kyle Turris from the Senators, a potential free agent who promptly signed a long term contract with the Predators. It is no use speculating on who won the trade because each team was at a different state of development and each has a different goal in mind. What was each team looking for?

Ottawa

Senators

They want the big man on the forward line, indeed probably the big line of the forwards. Last year, Ottawa took a significant stride forward in the playoffs, becoming Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh Penguins’ toughest opponent. They have a star defenceman in Erik Karlsson and a potential Stanley Cup winning goaltender in Craig Anderson, but their offence doesn’t scare anybody. Turris, despite his steady improvement and solid play doesn’t have the potential that Ottawa sees in Duchene. The Senators think their defeat by the Penguins last season was because they did not have anybody like Sidney Crosby or Evgeni Malkin at forward. They expect Duchene to be their Crosby or at least Malkin right now. The immediate task is to find line mates with chemistry for Duchene. There will be a lot of experiments in Ottawa at the beginning until a line is built around Duchene.

Nashville

Predators

Like the Senators, the Predators are looking for chemistry. But unlike the Senators, the Predators believe they already have their big man at forward, Filip Forsberg. They want somebody to play with him and they believe Kyle Turris is that guy. And if Turris turns out to not be that player, at least they have got someone who can make a significant improvement to their second line. They reached the Stanley Cup Final last year and in this trade, they have not traded someone significant from their existing team but added another significant player to it. Is Turris enough to make them the equal of Pittsburgh and put them over the top? He’s probably a step in the right direction, but to win it all now, there may be further moves coming.

Colorado

Avalanche

Joe Sakic has a rising young team who may have a real chance to make the playoffs this year. But he is willing to sacrifice that. In this Duchene trade, he is thinking long term. What he wants from this trade is depth. Almost all the players he received from Ottawa and Nashville are either first or second round draft choices whom the other two teams believe were not quite ready for the NHL yet. Sakic wants to find out for himself. If even only two of his flock of new players can make the Avalanche a better team, he’ll look on this trade as a successful 2 for 1 deal. The Avalanche of course are no strangers to this kind of transaction. Their most famous trade, the one that probably did the most to send them on their way to winning two Stanley Cups was when they traded (alias the Quebec Nordiques) number one pick Eric Lindros who refused to play in Quebec to Philadelphia for half a team in return. They hope the same thing will happen here.

Everybody was so excited by this trade that they could not wait to consummate it, even if it meant Ottawa and Colorado playing each other immediately in a back-to-back series in Sweden. Last year I wondered if the Senator-Avalanche match would be suitable to renew playing regular season games in Europe again and if a better match could not have been arranged. Ottawa was a good team but Colorado was near the bottom of the barrel. But the improvement of the Avalanche this year and now this trade should give the Swedish media and fans plenty to be interested about if they have been following along. Hopefully this match will increase interest in the NHL in Europe and mean more games being played there next year.

 

Some Cities Are Waking Up About New Arenas And Stadiums

The latest news from Calgary is that negotiations have broken off. These negotiations were about the controversial “Calgary Next” project, a combined NHL-CFL arena-stadium project or at least a single project that replaces the “old” Saddledome. It’s about time. Fans and their elected politicians should not be at the mercy of fickle and arrogant sports leagues that show no loyalty to their communities and expect new facilities every few decades.

Just what is wrong with the Calgary Saddledome? It is 34 years old and with over 19,000 seats, is one of the bigger NHL arenas. It has been renovated once. Suddenly the Calgary Flames ownership and management find it abhorrent. They of course do not want to pay for a new facility themselves and have issued a vague “or else” threat to the city if they do not get their way. (Are there secret negotiations with other cities without NHL hockey underway?)

Responsible representative municipal politicians have every reason to question the Flames and the NHL before plunging money into a possible bottomless pit, especially in this day and age. All they have to do is look at the actions of the even more high and mighty, arrogant NFL to fear the consequences. That wonderful league stripped St. Louis of the Cardinals but promised the city a new team if they would build a modern stadium. St. Louis complied and the NFL was happy to shift the Los Angeles Rams there when L.A. told the league to take a hike about building a new stadium.

Two decades later after Los Angeles finally decided to build a modern stadium, the NFL treacherously allowed the Rams to depart St. Louis because of the unstated reason that Los Angeles is a much bigger market where they can make more money. So much for the new modern stadium St. Louis built that is only a mere two decades old. Now the NFL wants them to build another one. The NFL could have expanded and started the process of becoming a 40 team league which would have hurt no one, but instead decided to unnecessarily hurt loyal fans and blackmail cities into spending billions on new facilities. To make the point plainer, they stripped San Diego and Oakland too. Based on the NFL which punishes cities and their taxpayers even if they comply with their wishes, if you were a Calgary municipal official, would you trust the NHL and the Flames?

The “Calgary Next” project is highly questionable. Costs range from under one billion to nearly to nearly two billion. If the costs cannot be accurate, there is no point even considering the project. Deceitful figures could cost taxpayers millions of dollars which could be spent better elsewhere. Taxpayers and their representatives have every right to delay and question things.

If this were the New York Islanders, a franchise that played in a facility that became obsolete, especially in seating capacity, and then moved to a facility that is even smaller with obstructed seats and bad ice, I would have some sympathy. But in Calgary there has been nothing specifically stated about what is wrong with the Saddledome. If the Flames would lay out what exactly is wrong, perhaps a much cheaper renovation could be attempted. But like spoiled brats they simply complain that the Saddledome is too old at 34 years old and then threaten to blackmail the city by leaving if they don’t get their way. If hockey was not so important to Calgary and its fans, I’d say, “See ya.”

Based on this logic, the 86 year old Empire State Building should have been torn down decades ago and a new one, taller than the Freedom Tower built. If sports franchise owners are this important, what about businessmen and home owners? Over 90% of all North American cities should be torn down and rebuilt at taxpayer expense because these people are “owed” it. But set a standard age date for a facility. 25 years, a quarter of a century and then tear it down. How about building me a new home? I deserve it.

What should be questioned is the whole concept of taxpayers paying for new facilities for rich sports franchise owners. Since when is a North American sports franchise owner “owed” a facility at public expense? Compared to most people, they’ve got too much already. But supporting a team is like a drug for most fans, as bad an addiction as alcohol, tobacco, coffee, cocaine, heroin, and marijuana. Under its spell, all logic is cast aside in an effort to be the top banana.

This problem is by no means confined to Calgary or even the NHL. Besides Calgary, here are a list of other current NHL related facility problems, excluding the legitimate New York Islander mess.

Quebec City, which wants the Nordiques back and complied with NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman’s terms and built the Videotron, which the NHL loves, only to be thwarted by the ownership factor and have a bidder whom the NHL can’t abide.

Hartford, which also wants the Whalers back and is now willing to spend $250 million to update the XL Center. But if the NHL cannot abide the 34 year old Saddledome, how can they accept a 41 year old renovated building? There has been no comment by the NHL if this renovation will be acceptable. Hartford could be spending $250 million for nothing.

Hamilton, which was a front-running city for an NHL team in the 1980s and built Copps Coliseum in the anticipation of NHL expansion only to lose its potential franchise to Ottawa in a bungled bid. The city was prepared to spend $50 million to upgrade the arena if Jim Balsille managed to pry the Coyotes from Phoenix but the NHL opposed it and Buffalo and Toronto refused to set reasonable compensation terms. Thus the two best Canadian markets, Hamilton and Quebec City, sure money makers, remain without teams.

The possible end of the Phoenix Coyotes. Here at least, common sense may be taking over. Both the NHL and the suburb of Glendale have publicly said that they want to be rid of each other. An arena, specifically built for the Coyotes that is only 13 years old is now completely unsuitable. The NHL wants a new downtown Phoenix arena built. But the Arizona legislature and local taxpayers and their representatives are not going to have much sympathy for a franchise that is abandoning a 13 year old facility that was built specifically for them at taxpayer expense and has only iced a competitive team once in its entire history. Gary Bettman’s dream of a Phoenix team may come to an end.

Ottawa, which claims that its current arena is too far away to attract sellout crowds consistently. The Senators want a new downtown arena built. This may be the only new project that gets off the ground without much controversy.

Seattle, which was the front runner, along with Las Vegas and Quebec in the last NHL expansion. But nobody can decide who will build and where a new arena can be built. And if the potential NBA owner builds the arena, will it have the same problems that the New York Islanders found in the Barclay’s Center that was built specifically for basketball?

Kansas City, which built the Sprint Center to get both an NHL and NBA franchise. But nobody trusts the Kansas City market as being suitable for big league hockey. Kansas City has hosted some NHL preseason exhibition games which were either sellouts or half full depending on who was playing. And local investors did not like the NHL’s greedy $500 million expansion fee. So the Sprint Center remains empty without a professional hockey and basketball tenant.

Milwaukee and San Francisco which are currently building new arenas for the local NBA team. But both new facilities will be far under the current NHL seating medium of over 18,000 seats and since they are being built for a basketball team, they may have the same problems as the Barclay’s Center.

It’s time for some sober second judgment. Every hockey fan wants a local NHL team with a good facility but there has to be a return to common sense first. North American professional sports have become more and more unreal, catering only for rich fans. But when every taxpayer, rich and poor is on the hook for sports facility projects, the mindless worship for professional sports has to be set aside. There is too much money being wasted right now. Some cities are waking up to it. We’ll see what plays out.

 

Wasted Summer By The NHL

Well the new 2017-18 NHL season is about to dawn and the NHL gets revived after a school teacher two month vacation. In June there were exciting events; the crowning of the 2017 NHL champion Pittsburgh Penguins, the NHL Awards Banquet, the start of the new Las Vegas Golden Knights, and the NHL draft. After that flurry the NHL has taken what it considers a well deserved two month vacation.

Since July 1, the only news at the NHL website is which free agents signed with which teams, and a series of articles about the strength and weakness of every team for next season. The only significant news was that Dallas was chosen to be the site of next year’s NHL draft in honor of its 25th anniversary. Oh yes – the new Detroit arena opened.

Pardon me, but I think that is a poor result for a summer where so many important issues that can affect the NHL long term have gone unresolved. Sure everybody deserves a rest, but I was hoping that at least one major issue would be resolved before the new season started. All the significant issues that were shelved on July 1, are still present now with the start of this new season, and in some cases, with less time to solve them, some with potential dire consequences. Am I the only one who is being a sour, Scroogey, sore-head who thinks that this summer was wasted by the NHL which should have been working maybe even overtime to solve its problems and then putting its feet up for a well-earned rest?

I am not alone if you are a Quebec Nordiques fan and want to be finally taken out of the “suspended” state that the NHL placed Quebec in after the last bungled attempt at expansion. Resolving the Quebec situation would mean that Commissioner Bettman and the NHL finally found an acceptable owner instead of the pro-separatist Pierre Karl Peladeau who made inappropriate and unacceptable public remarks about Montreal Canadiens owner Geoff Molson. Instead one of the two best markets in Canada without an NHL team, one of the more valuable franchises in the NHL, only has a couple of Montreal Canadiens pre-season exhibition games to look forward to next season. Its beautiful new arena, the Videotron which the NHL loves is wasted and empty, a continuing scandal to a summer of nothing.

And as a sidelight, the granting of a new Quebec expansion franchise would allow the NHL to realign at last into a 32 team NFL structure which would allow the league to expand comfortably in the future to at least 40 and even 48 teams. Instead, thanks to the greedy terms of the bungled last attempt at expansion, the league only got the new Las Vegas team, leaving it at 31 teams, one short of the symmetrical 32 necessary for realignment.

The NHL should have been working its tail off this summer at devising some acceptable new expansion terms so that it could expand as soon as possible and resolve the alignment problem. The investment world found a $500 million expansion fee too excessive and backed away during the last expansion leaving only fanatical Las Vegas and Quebec left, a humiliating embarrassment for the NHL. Now they have to either set an appropriate NHL expansion fee or wait indefinitely for investors to accept their current half a billion dollar terms. Expansion and realignment could be delayed for a long, long time.

And on the expansion front, Quebec’s brother franchise, Hartford, which also lost its team in the 1990s finally made some news last season by announcing a $250 million upgrade of the XL Center to a 19,000 seating capacity. So Whaler fans will also want to know the NHL’s opinion about this renovation, whether an upgraded 41 year old building will be suitable to get their team back and any expansion terms and fees that might occur along the way. But there has been no official announcement by the NHL on any of this, during the summer.

And when you mention Hartford now, you also draw in the New York Islanders because the Hartford mayor and the Connecticut governor sent the Islanders ownership a formal letter inviting them to become the new, relocated Hartford Whalers once the XL Center renovation is completed. The Islanders are having arena problems right now. The second-smallest NHL arena, the Barclay’s Center was built for basketball and has bad ice and obstructed view seats for hockey and the Islanders cannot sell it out. Because of the arena, the Islanders had the second worst attendance last year and if they don’t get good attendance they cannot afford to pay star players like John Tavares and build a competitive team.

The very existence of the Islanders depends on getting some kind of new arena, either by a move to Hartford or a new facility to be built in Queens. Time is running out and there have been no announcements about any positive developments this summer. This issue will heat up as the new season progresses. It is rumored that the Barclay Center itself wants the Islanders gone as soon as possible. The sooner this problem is solved the better, before an invisible gun is pointed at the NHL’s head.

And the NHL has a similar problem in its Western Conference, in Phoenix where both the NHL and the citizens of Glendale have publicly said they are finished with each other. Gary Bettman’s attempts to keep a team in Phoenix including the NHL owning the team and keeping it from falling into the lap of Hamilton via Jim Balsille may finally be over if a new arena in the downtown area is not built. But Phoenix and Arizona taxpayers are not going to be too eager to build a new arena for a franchise that is abandoning a facility that is only 13 years old and has only iced a competitive team once in its entire history. And in this summer of NHL nothing, there have been no announcements about a new arena or any move by the Coyotes to another city like Portland or Seattle.

And there have been no announcements about a new Seattle arena finally being built. Seattle, a “done deal”, a front-running city for an NHL franchise during the last horrible NHL expansion somehow bungled its bid like front-runners Houston and Hamilton did in expansions before them. The NHL was specifically courting Seattle because it was a western city that could balance up its conferences but the arena soap opera is going on with no end in sight. The NHL got their 31st team, Las Vegas, but not their 32nd team to balance things and realign.

Also on the arena front, there have been no announcements about the start of new arenas in Calgary and Ottawa. Bettman made a tour of these Canadian cites as well as Phoenix urging a resolution to these facility situations. There seems to be positive sentiment in Ottawa for a new downtown facility, but in Calgary, many politicians and citizens are questioning the terms and financial figures of the proposed “Calgary Next” project. And the Flames added fuel to the fire by threatening to walk out. There is nothing positive to announce in this summer of nothing in either city.

Nor is there anything positive to report internationally. The NHL pulled out of the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics in South Korea next year leaving many NHL players threatening to desert their teams and play for their country anyway. As if that was not enough, the South Koreans who have been down in the dregs of international hockey since it began, suddenly improved enough to be promoted to the top level of international play in next year’s World Championship. That could be awfully embarrassing for Bettman who has been trying to revive the World Cup and promote international hockey and for the NHL which has now snubbed a potential new market of 50 million people, if the South Koreans do anything significant in next year’s tournament. But no announcement during the summer of any change of heart has been made.

Likewise, there has been no announcement of any new developments to improve the quality of international hockey below the traditional “big 7″ country level. Vancouver and Los Angeles will play some exhibition games in low ranked, but big market China. And Boston and Los Angeles will host some clinics for the Chinese too. But there have been no formulated plans set out to raise the standard of play particularly in the dozen “B level” countries just below the “big 7″ so that a real expansion of international hockey and the revived World Cup can be made. Just the same old thing since 1972 when NHL professionals began playing in international tournaments.

All these issues plus others that were shelved during the summer are still there when the NHL comes back from vacation. Thwarted hopes for expansion and realignment, the fate of the Winter Olympics, unresolved arena issues, improvement of international hockey, are still now hotter than ever. Am I the only person who is a sourpuss because it seems to me that nothing was done on these issues? Will the NHL come to rue that some of these issues might have been solved or at least worked on during the past summer? Can these issues continue to be shelved forever?

 

NHL Goes Back To Europe…But Don’t Pull An NFL

There was some good news and bad news when the NHL announced that it would play some regular season games in Europe once more, this time in Stockholm, Sweden. It will be the first regular season NHL games in Europe since 2011. The NHL is billing this as a revival of the “NHL Global Series” and will feature two games between the Ottawa Senators and the Colorado Avalanche in November.

The good news is that NHL is playing games in Europe once more. This will give the fans over there a chance to see the best players in the world playing in front of them again. There are several Swedish players on Ottawa and Colorado so there will be some native players to cheer for. It is also a great way to improve the morale of the non-North American NHL players, who now compose a significant 26% of the total NHL rosters. The NHL is also proclaiming that these games will be part of its Centennial Celebration.

It is also a good way to prepare the ground for future NHL expansion to Europe. While that is still a long-term goal, perhaps even a very-long-term goal, it is still a feasible future concept, not some dead, dormant idea that cannot be realized. With future improvements in transportation, travel to other continents may not be so difficult and teams in Europe and Asia competing for the Stanley Cup may occur at some later date. This is certainly a progressive, not backwards idea.

Besides the Stanley Cup is already an international trophy. European players on the winning team have been taking it to Europe every year and displaying it proudly over there just like their North American teammates do in Canada and the United States. Having teams based in Europe and Asia will just complete the picture.

The bad news is the team match-up. Ottawa is a good choice, but Colorado is worst team in the NHL this year and is vying with Las Vegas for the number one draft choice. While there are some good players on Colorado, some Swedish natives as noted above, and the idea of next year’s number 1 or 2 draft choice playing two games in Sweden is good, the NHL should not give Europe “garbage games” that are a poor draw in North America. Please NHL, do not ape the NFL.

That arrogant league has just sanctioned another “traditional” franchise city to lose its team – this time the San Diego Chargers, again to Los Angeles, just like it did last year to St. Louis, not because of poor fan support, not because of a bad stadium, but because Los Angeles is the second largest market in the United States and the NFL wants to peddle itself in larger, “more important” markets than “small city” St. Louis and San Diego. (What’s next? The Las Vegas Raiders? It’s a distinct possibility.) So much for loyal fan support, local corporate sponsorship, extensive local media coverage, and local government perks that were given to the NFL owners.

It is even more disgracefully arrogant when it is remembered that Los Angeles merely yawned when the Raiders and Rams left in 1995 and could not care less whether the NFL came back or not. Los Angeles was content to live for two decades without the NFL. In L.A., the movie star, not the sports figure is king and queen. Los Angeles certainly did not react the way the stricken cities of Baltimore, Cleveland, Houston, Oakland and St. Louis did when they lost their teams. Nor does the NHL, NBA and MLB sanction the stripping of franchises from cities on the scale the NFL does.

But the NFL’s arrogance does not stop there. They despise foreigners and make no secret of it. When the Buffalo Bills played some of their games in Toronto, ticket prices were set so high that even the most fanatical Toronto fans, longing for an NFL team of their own, had to wince and think twice about buying a ticket. Games did not come close to selling out. Still worse are the games that are played in London, England. Usually, the NFL selects the games between teams at the bottom of the heap, that are the worst draw, which they know will not sell out in North America and ships them off to football-starved London. Last year there were open calls of derision by the British NFL fans at the sheer gall and arrogance of it.

Hopefully that will not happen with this renewed “NHL Global Series”. The NHL has far more at stake in Europe than the arrogant NFL. The NHL has a significant number of European players, scouts, and management in its league and there is no need to offend them. Give the Europeans decent games to watch which will encourage fan support and pay off in the future. Hockey has to grow around the world and arrogance and stupidity by North American professional sports leagues will not help.

Is The NHL Really Fighting Cancer?

Back in the spring during last year’s playoffs I wrote a two part article about Pascal Dupuis, who was forced to retire from the Pittsburgh Penguins because he was suffering from blood clots, a form of coronary heart disease. I went on to explain that I too had suffered from the same problem, only in a more serious way. In 2008 I was examined and told that I had a build-up of heart plaque of unknown size and location near my heart and would have to undergo an angiogram, probably as a first step to having open heart surgery, either a stent or a bypass operation.

But during the interval, I researched on the Internet for alternatives to surgery, discovered one called a chelation remedy and decided to try it. Not only did the remedy remove the plaque from around my heart within 24 hours, it cleaned out my entire circulatory system at the same time, thus reducing my chances from having a heart attack, blood clots, or a stroke in the brain. In effect I was cured.

I explained in my articles how the cure worked and why it worked. Two friends of mine have subsequently tried it and were cured too.

I then explained to my readers why this cure was not recognized, how people continue to be prescribed the wrong treatments for coronary heart disease, how established medicine is perfectly willing to let people die or undergo unnecessary surgery like bypasses and stents. I explained that through the current clinical trial system, it is not only possible to exclude “bad medicine” like thalidomide from reaching the public (which the clinical trial system was set up to do) but also prevent legitimate cures from being accepted (which it is not supposed to do).

The sad fact is that too many people are making money from death and suffering and do not want cures to reach the public. In the case of coronary heart disease, the United States alone spends $75 billion dollars a year on unnecessary “heart medicine” which patients have to take when they have open heart surgery. The average number of drugs a heart patient has to take is 12, sometimes rising as high as 30. If the chelation remedy was recognized as a cure, goodbye to the 30 drugs and the $75 billion in profits.

The opposition to the chelation remedy was extremely ruthless. They set up a sham clinical trial called Tact, claimed the chelation remedy could do more than it was supposed to do, in this case claiming that the remedy could benefit autistic children, and then proceeded to murder two young autistic children with the remedy, in spite of the fact that the remedy is not supposed to be given to children at all. My cure for heart disease was declared a dangerous substance and then classified as “alternative medicine”.

The chelation remedy is not the only casualty from the system. My last job in Canada was to be an administrator at a Shiatsu School. The principal of the school endorsed shiatsu because he used to have chronic hay fever and after taking shiatsu massage treatments, he never had another attack. Shiatsu also claims it can cure other allergies. But like the chelation remedy, it is unrecognized by the FDA and Health Canada. It too is classified as “alternative medicine”.

The failure to recognize the chelation remedy had a significant effect on last year’s NHL playoffs. Pascal Dupuis did not play at all for Pittsburgh and was forced to retire. Steve Stamkos of the Tampa Bay Lighting missed the entire playoffs except the last game against Pittsburgh because he had similar blood clots like Dupuis and had to get an unnecessary operation. And then legendary NHL star, Gordie Howe died after suffering a series of strokes in the brain. Based on my (and many others) experience with the chelation remedy (which users can obtain privately over the Internet or get at specialized chelation clinics around the world), Dupuis should still be playing, Stamkos would not have missed a single playoff game, and Howe would still be alive. Tampa Bay, not Pittsburgh might have won the Stanley Cup if Stamkos had been there for every game. The health care industry with its cover up of a legitimate cure for coronary heart disease was the real winner of the Stanley Cup.

Which brings this article to the current case of Craig Anderson, number one goaltender of the Ottawa Senators. Recently Anderson’s wife was diagnosed with cancer and he was forced to take a leave of absence from his team. She will probably get the usual treatments prescribed for cancer. But given the evidence listed above about the defects of the clinical trial system and the power of pharmaceutical companies and other interested parties who have profitable reasons to keep diseases going, it is not beyond reason to be suspicious about any “attempts” to “cure” cancer by “established medicine”.

Anderson will be sorely missed by the Senators. In fact he may be the best player on their team and his loss may have the same effect that the loss of goaltender Carey Price had on the Montreal Canadiens last year. Montreal dropped from the top of the NHL standings right out of the playoffs. So could this year’s Ottawa Senators.

October is supposed to be “Cancer Awareness Month” and you see NHL players and players from other professional leagues wearing pink (the color that is supposed to represent breast cancer in women). But are the current treatments really the best treatments? Are there better treatments being blocked by the clinical trial system just like the chelation remedy? Are there treatments that work that are being condemned to obscurity as “alternative medicine”?

I have had two significant clashes with cancer in my own life. My mother got lung cancer in February, 1987 (she was a light to heavy smoker). She had an operation that month that removed a piece of cancer the size of a quarter. But unknown to everyone, a piece had broken off and reattached itself to the base of her spine where no scan was able to detect it. By the time it was recognized that she still had more cancer it was too late. She underwent a second operation in the autumn but not all the cancer could be removed. She wasted away and died in early December.

While nothing about her condition and death could be termed “suspicious” I felt that there were a lot of questionable things in the affair. Why did the scans fail to pick up the new cancer? Both of us were lied to about her condition repeatedly. I was never kept informed though I requested up to date information. I felt we were being treated like a number and not a human patient, and I was never told the truth face to face by any doctor. Instead I found out over the telephone that my mother was going to die when I was given the telephone number of the “Bereavement Squad” to call.

The other cancer case involved my next door neighbor, one of Canada’s best television journalists from the CBC, Wendy Mesley. Late in November, 2004, the day after the Grey Cup game, Wendy told me that she had just found out that she had breast cancer. It was quite a shock and out of respect for her privacy, I never mentioned it to anybody.

Wendy underwent several kinds of treatments including chemotherapy which caused her to lose all of her hair. Occasionally, I would ask her husband, Liam or her care giver, how she was doing and I was given to understand that it was a very checkered path. There would be good days and there would be bad days and nobody could really predict what would happen. Fortunately she survived.

The cancer experience left Wendy very bitter especially against the pharmaceutical companies. She felt that she could have received better treatments. There was even a television special to explain her experience.

Given what I would later experience with coronary heart disease, and how I managed to cure myself in spite of the doctors, I am inclined to agree with her. I’ll repeat what I said above: There are too many people in the health care industry making too much money from suffering and death. So long as the disease doesn’t strike them, they don’t care. If a coverup of a cure for coronary heart disease can happen, then so can a coverup for a cancer cure occur too.

More and more people are turning to “alternative medicine” instead of accepting what the doctors tell them. From now on, when I am prescribed anything I don’t know about, I research the Internet instead of mindlessly accepting what I am told. I have already rejected several other “medicines” that could have affected my heart negatively.

But the NHL and the other sports leagues do what the doctors tell them. They wear pink ribbons and participate in public events to raise awareness about cancer. The late Terry Fox, another celebrated cancer victim would be proud. But are they really doing anything significant about the disease itself? Given the corruption in the health care industry that I uncovered the hard way, it is highly questionable.