Is The NHL Really Fighting Cancer?

Back in the spring during last year’s playoffs I wrote a two part article about Pascal Dupuis, who was forced to retire from the Pittsburgh Penguins because he was suffering from blood clots, a form of coronary heart disease. I went on to explain that I too had suffered from the same problem, only in a more serious way. In 2008 I was examined and told that I had a build-up of heart plaque of unknown size and location near my heart and would have to undergo an angiogram, probably as a first step to having open heart surgery, either a stent or a bypass operation.

But during the interval, I researched on the Internet for alternatives to surgery, discovered one called a chelation remedy and decided to try it. Not only did the remedy remove the plaque from around my heart within 24 hours, it cleaned out my entire circulatory system at the same time, thus reducing my chances from having a heart attack, blood clots, or a stroke in the brain. In effect I was cured.

I explained in my articles how the cure worked and why it worked. Two friends of mine have subsequently tried it and were cured too.

I then explained to my readers why this cure was not recognized, how people continue to be prescribed the wrong treatments for coronary heart disease, how established medicine is perfectly willing to let people die or undergo unnecessary surgery like bypasses and stents. I explained that through the current clinical trial system, it is not only possible to exclude “bad medicine” like thalidomide from reaching the public (which the clinical trial system was set up to do) but also prevent legitimate cures from being accepted (which it is not supposed to do).

The sad fact is that too many people are making money from death and suffering and do not want cures to reach the public. In the case of coronary heart disease, the United States alone spends $75 billion dollars a year on unnecessary “heart medicine” which patients have to take when they have open heart surgery. The average number of drugs a heart patient has to take is 12, sometimes rising as high as 30. If the chelation remedy was recognized as a cure, goodbye to the 30 drugs and the $75 billion in profits.

The opposition to the chelation remedy was extremely ruthless. They set up a sham clinical trial called Tact, claimed the chelation remedy could do more than it was supposed to do, in this case claiming that the remedy could benefit autistic children, and then proceeded to murder two young autistic children with the remedy, in spite of the fact that the remedy is not supposed to be given to children at all. My cure for heart disease was declared a dangerous substance and then classified as “alternative medicine”.

The chelation remedy is not the only casualty from the system. My last job in Canada was to be an administrator at a Shiatsu School. The principal of the school endorsed shiatsu because he used to have chronic hay fever and after taking shiatsu massage treatments, he never had another attack. Shiatsu also claims it can cure other allergies. But like the chelation remedy, it is unrecognized by the FDA and Health Canada. It too is classified as “alternative medicine”.

The failure to recognize the chelation remedy had a significant effect on last year’s NHL playoffs. Pascal Dupuis did not play at all for Pittsburgh and was forced to retire. Steve Stamkos of the Tampa Bay Lighting missed the entire playoffs except the last game against Pittsburgh because he had similar blood clots like Dupuis and had to get an unnecessary operation. And then legendary NHL star, Gordie Howe died after suffering a series of strokes in the brain. Based on my (and many others) experience with the chelation remedy (which users can obtain privately over the Internet or get at specialized chelation clinics around the world), Dupuis should still be playing, Stamkos would not have missed a single playoff game, and Howe would still be alive. Tampa Bay, not Pittsburgh might have won the Stanley Cup if Stamkos had been there for every game. The health care industry with its cover up of a legitimate cure for coronary heart disease was the real winner of the Stanley Cup.

Which brings this article to the current case of Craig Anderson, number one goaltender of the Ottawa Senators. Recently Anderson’s wife was diagnosed with cancer and he was forced to take a leave of absence from his team. She will probably get the usual treatments prescribed for cancer. But given the evidence listed above about the defects of the clinical trial system and the power of pharmaceutical companies and other interested parties who have profitable reasons to keep diseases going, it is not beyond reason to be suspicious about any “attempts” to “cure” cancer by “established medicine”.

Anderson will be sorely missed by the Senators. In fact he may be the best player on their team and his loss may have the same effect that the loss of goaltender Carey Price had on the Montreal Canadiens last year. Montreal dropped from the top of the NHL standings right out of the playoffs. So could this year’s Ottawa Senators.

October is supposed to be “Cancer Awareness Month” and you see NHL players and players from other professional leagues wearing pink (the color that is supposed to represent breast cancer in women). But are the current treatments really the best treatments? Are there better treatments being blocked by the clinical trial system just like the chelation remedy? Are there treatments that work that are being condemned to obscurity as “alternative medicine”?

I have had two significant clashes with cancer in my own life. My mother got lung cancer in February, 1987 (she was a light to heavy smoker). She had an operation that month that removed a piece of cancer the size of a quarter. But unknown to everyone, a piece had broken off and reattached itself to the base of her spine where no scan was able to detect it. By the time it was recognized that she still had more cancer it was too late. She underwent a second operation in the autumn but not all the cancer could be removed. She wasted away and died in early December.

While nothing about her condition and death could be termed “suspicious” I felt that there were a lot of questionable things in the affair. Why did the scans fail to pick up the new cancer? Both of us were lied to about her condition repeatedly. I was never kept informed though I requested up to date information. I felt we were being treated like a number and not a human patient, and I was never told the truth face to face by any doctor. Instead I found out over the telephone that my mother was going to die when I was given the telephone number of the “Bereavement Squad” to call.

The other cancer case involved my next door neighbor, one of Canada’s best television journalists from the CBC, Wendy Mesley. Late in November, 2004, the day after the Grey Cup game, Wendy told me that she had just found out that she had breast cancer. It was quite a shock and out of respect for her privacy, I never mentioned it to anybody.

Wendy underwent several kinds of treatments including chemotherapy which caused her to lose all of her hair. Occasionally, I would ask her husband, Liam or her care giver, how she was doing and I was given to understand that it was a very checkered path. There would be good days and there would be bad days and nobody could really predict what would happen. Fortunately she survived.

The cancer experience left Wendy very bitter especially against the pharmaceutical companies. She felt that she could have received better treatments. There was even a television special to explain her experience.

Given what I would later experience with coronary heart disease, and how I managed to cure myself in spite of the doctors, I am inclined to agree with her. I’ll repeat what I said above: There are too many people in the health care industry making too much money from suffering and death. So long as the disease doesn’t strike them, they don’t care. If a coverup of a cure for coronary heart disease can happen, then so can a coverup for a cancer cure occur too.

More and more people are turning to “alternative medicine” instead of accepting what the doctors tell them. From now on, when I am prescribed anything I don’t know about, I research the Internet instead of mindlessly accepting what I am told. I have already rejected several other “medicines” that could have affected my heart negatively.

But the NHL and the other sports leagues do what the doctors tell them. They wear pink ribbons and participate in public events to raise awareness about cancer. The late Terry Fox, another celebrated cancer victim would be proud. But are they really doing anything significant about the disease itself? Given the corruption in the health care industry that I uncovered the hard way, it is highly questionable.

 

Pascal Dupuis Did NOT Have To Retire Part 1

While NHL fans are awaiting the outcome of the Conference Finals and whether or not there will be NHL expansion, I must find other topics of interest. One seemingly trivial topic that did not attract much notice was the retirement of Pittsburgh Penguin, Pascal Dupuis (above top left) due to recurring blood clots. Dupuis is also Pittsburgh’s choice this year for the Bill Masterton Trophy. But this story is not trivial and can affect every figure in sports, and everybody else all over the planet.

Blood clots are also significantly affecting the Penguins current opponents in the Stanley Cup Playoffs, the Tampa Bay Lightning. Star Lightning forward Steve Stamkos (above top right)  has not played a single playoff game since recovering from surgery for the removal of a blood clot in his neck. As for Dupuis, he has tried to come back several times but has finally given up for good. Too bad he – and the Penguins, the Lightning and the NHL – does not know the truth, that only an insider like myself found out – the hard way.

 
Blood clots are a form of coronary heart disease (sometimes popularly called “hardening of the arteries”). This disease is the worst killer in North America – even more than cancer – and probably in the world. Over 10,000 Canadians die each year. In the United States it is probably hideous Holocaust numbers. It can strike anyone (and mammals and birds) at any time of life. It has killed or maimed too many notable sports figures to count, Dupuis, Johnny Unitas, Ron Lancaster, Bobby Ackles, – and most tragically for hockey, top New York Rangers draft pick Alexei Cherepanov in 2008, aged only 19 (above bottom left).

Coronary heart disease can cause death and serious health problems in several ways. If too much heart plaque concentrates around the heart area, it can cause a heart attack, sometimes fatally. If the concentration occurs in the brain, the result is a stroke. Then there are the various “minor” health problems like Dupuis’s and Stamkos’s clots.

In 2008, I was diagnosed with coronary heart disease after various tests showed that I had a blockage of unknown size and unknown location somewhere around my heart. I was scheduled for an angiogram (where a long tube with a mini-camera is inserted into an artery to hunt for the blockage) two months later and given a box of nitroglycerin to carry at all times in case the worst should occur. Once the blockage was found I would probably be scheduled for some form of open heart surgery, probably a bypass or stent operation, if I was fortunate enough to live that long.

Fortunately I lived in the age of the Internet and was able to take action of my own. First I thought that since it was 2008, was the composition of heart plaque known? Through research on the Internet I discovered this was true. I then thought, “If the composition of heart plaque is known, why doesn’t somebody invent some kind of drug or remedy to remove it without anybody having to go through open heart surgery?” So on a whim I typed “stuff to remove heart plaque” into the Internet search engine and to my amazement, up came several websites claiming they had products to do just that.

I had two reactions; on one hand I had hope again and rejoiced because this was offering me an alternative to open heart surgery or death; on the other I was cynical, skeptical, and suspicious because no doctor had told me about such products and this might only be people telling me what I wanted to hear. After all, coronary heart disease is officially classified as “incurable”.

But the chance to be cured was too good to be ignored, especially when compared with the two alternatives, death or heart surgery. So I spent over a month doing research on the Internet about these products. There was a lot of hatred and scare tactics on the Internet, though significantly NOT by people who had used the product. I visited the companies’ websites, viewed forums by people who had used these products, found out possible side effects, learned whatever I could and in the end I asked myself what was the worst that could happen if I tried one of them.

There were four restrictions about taking this product and none applied to me. It was not recommended for children nor for pregnant women, and it was not recommended for people with either liver or kidney disease. The only side effect was diarrhea. So the worst that could happen to me was that I would stay the same, have a bad case of diarrhea, and waste $180 (including the price of shipping) plus another dollar to buy a jug of distilled water to mix the remedy. But what if it worked?

I have wasted money in worse ways so I decided to try one. It came from Minnesota and arrived by special courier four days later. It was a six week program, requiring me to take the remedy six times a day at different intervals, gradually being reduced to four times a day.

To make a long story short, I cynically took my six doses that first day and then retired to bed. I did not feel any better but when I woke up 4½ hours later, everything had changed. I now could feel blood flow around my heart that I could not feel before. It was 16½ hours after I had taken my first dose. And it was only now that I truly began to believe that this remedy was doing what it promised to do: remove heart plaque from my body.

Two weeks later was my angiogram and it confirmed what I believed; the tube with the camera could not find anything to operate on. I had beaten coronary heart disease without open heart surgery.   Eight years later I am still alive and have no more chest pains.

So what is this stuff and how does it work? To understand what had happened, people have to know two things; the difference between veins and arteries and capillaries; and the composition of heart plaque. The walls of veins have only two layers while arteries and capillaries have three. This is why most blockages occur in the latter.

Heart plaque is composed of two substances, cholesterol and minerals. If somebody were to pour a gallon of pure cholesterol down a completely clean artery, nothing would stick and everything would be converted into urine. But because humans, mammals, and birds eat, breathe, and absorb minerals, some of them stick to the walls of arteries and capillaries. Then when cholesterol is absorbed, it in turn sticks to the minerals – not to the walls of the blood vessels – forming heart plaque.

The remedy I took is called a chelation remedy (above bottom right) – chelation meaning to purify. In effect it is an acid. It goes into the circulatory system where it dissolves the bond between the minerals and the wall of the blood vessels and sweeps them away. Since the cholesterol has nothing more to stick to, it too gets swept away and everything gets safely converted into urine by the kidneys.

Chelation has been around since the 1950s, when it was used to remove toxic mineral buildup in miners. There are two ways of doing it, either buying it over the Internet like I did and being my own doctor, or (if a patient does not trust himself/herself) going to a special chelation clinic (there are lots of these clinics around the world) and getting the plaque removed under a doctor’s supervision. But this is more expensive. There are many videos about chelation on You Tube.

So Pascal Dupuis and Steve Stamkos could get rid of their blood clots by the chelation remedy and be playing again. Of course the plaque will return again over time but by taking the remedy at regular intervals for the rest of their lives, they will never get into the danger zone again. And chelation has another huge advantage over open heart surgery. Surgery only gets rid of the plaque around the heart area while the chelation remedy gets rid of it from the entire body. So not only are people protected from heart attacks, they are also protected from strokes in the brain and blood clots anywhere else.

Unfortunately in my case, while my angiogram confirmed I no longer had coronary heart disease, the first disease had caused a second disease, heart failure, which is damage to the heart itself. This occurred because the effort of my heart to pump the blood when the blood vessels were clogged strained the heart’s muscles. (There have been developments concerning this disease but that merits a separate article.) So if Dupuis were to be allowed to return, he would also have to be cleared for heart failure as well.

So if a cure for coronary heart disease exists why do not doctors prescribe it? Why do so few people know about it? Why are scare tactics being used to discourage people from trying it? The answer is in part 2.

Next: Why No Cure?