Is The NHL Really Fighting Cancer?

Back in the spring during last year’s playoffs I wrote a two part article about Pascal Dupuis, who was forced to retire from the Pittsburgh Penguins because he was suffering from blood clots, a form of coronary heart disease. I went on to explain that I too had suffered from the same problem, only in a more serious way. In 2008 I was examined and told that I had a build-up of heart plaque of unknown size and location near my heart and would have to undergo an angiogram, probably as a first step to having open heart surgery, either a stent or a bypass operation.

But during the interval, I researched on the Internet for alternatives to surgery, discovered one called a chelation remedy and decided to try it. Not only did the remedy remove the plaque from around my heart within 24 hours, it cleaned out my entire circulatory system at the same time, thus reducing my chances from having a heart attack, blood clots, or a stroke in the brain. In effect I was cured.

I explained in my articles how the cure worked and why it worked. Two friends of mine have subsequently tried it and were cured too.

I then explained to my readers why this cure was not recognized, how people continue to be prescribed the wrong treatments for coronary heart disease, how established medicine is perfectly willing to let people die or undergo unnecessary surgery like bypasses and stents. I explained that through the current clinical trial system, it is not only possible to exclude “bad medicine” like thalidomide from reaching the public (which the clinical trial system was set up to do) but also prevent legitimate cures from being accepted (which it is not supposed to do).

The sad fact is that too many people are making money from death and suffering and do not want cures to reach the public. In the case of coronary heart disease, the United States alone spends $75 billion dollars a year on unnecessary “heart medicine” which patients have to take when they have open heart surgery. The average number of drugs a heart patient has to take is 12, sometimes rising as high as 30. If the chelation remedy was recognized as a cure, goodbye to the 30 drugs and the $75 billion in profits.

The opposition to the chelation remedy was extremely ruthless. They set up a sham clinical trial called Tact, claimed the chelation remedy could do more than it was supposed to do, in this case claiming that the remedy could benefit autistic children, and then proceeded to murder two young autistic children with the remedy, in spite of the fact that the remedy is not supposed to be given to children at all. My cure for heart disease was declared a dangerous substance and then classified as “alternative medicine”.

The chelation remedy is not the only casualty from the system. My last job in Canada was to be an administrator at a Shiatsu School. The principal of the school endorsed shiatsu because he used to have chronic hay fever and after taking shiatsu massage treatments, he never had another attack. Shiatsu also claims it can cure other allergies. But like the chelation remedy, it is unrecognized by the FDA and Health Canada. It too is classified as “alternative medicine”.

The failure to recognize the chelation remedy had a significant effect on last year’s NHL playoffs. Pascal Dupuis did not play at all for Pittsburgh and was forced to retire. Steve Stamkos of the Tampa Bay Lighting missed the entire playoffs except the last game against Pittsburgh because he had similar blood clots like Dupuis and had to get an unnecessary operation. And then legendary NHL star, Gordie Howe died after suffering a series of strokes in the brain. Based on my (and many others) experience with the chelation remedy (which users can obtain privately over the Internet or get at specialized chelation clinics around the world), Dupuis should still be playing, Stamkos would not have missed a single playoff game, and Howe would still be alive. Tampa Bay, not Pittsburgh might have won the Stanley Cup if Stamkos had been there for every game. The health care industry with its cover up of a legitimate cure for coronary heart disease was the real winner of the Stanley Cup.

Which brings this article to the current case of Craig Anderson, number one goaltender of the Ottawa Senators. Recently Anderson’s wife was diagnosed with cancer and he was forced to take a leave of absence from his team. She will probably get the usual treatments prescribed for cancer. But given the evidence listed above about the defects of the clinical trial system and the power of pharmaceutical companies and other interested parties who have profitable reasons to keep diseases going, it is not beyond reason to be suspicious about any “attempts” to “cure” cancer by “established medicine”.

Anderson will be sorely missed by the Senators. In fact he may be the best player on their team and his loss may have the same effect that the loss of goaltender Carey Price had on the Montreal Canadiens last year. Montreal dropped from the top of the NHL standings right out of the playoffs. So could this year’s Ottawa Senators.

October is supposed to be “Cancer Awareness Month” and you see NHL players and players from other professional leagues wearing pink (the color that is supposed to represent breast cancer in women). But are the current treatments really the best treatments? Are there better treatments being blocked by the clinical trial system just like the chelation remedy? Are there treatments that work that are being condemned to obscurity as “alternative medicine”?

I have had two significant clashes with cancer in my own life. My mother got lung cancer in February, 1987 (she was a light to heavy smoker). She had an operation that month that removed a piece of cancer the size of a quarter. But unknown to everyone, a piece had broken off and reattached itself to the base of her spine where no scan was able to detect it. By the time it was recognized that she still had more cancer it was too late. She underwent a second operation in the autumn but not all the cancer could be removed. She wasted away and died in early December.

While nothing about her condition and death could be termed “suspicious” I felt that there were a lot of questionable things in the affair. Why did the scans fail to pick up the new cancer? Both of us were lied to about her condition repeatedly. I was never kept informed though I requested up to date information. I felt we were being treated like a number and not a human patient, and I was never told the truth face to face by any doctor. Instead I found out over the telephone that my mother was going to die when I was given the telephone number of the “Bereavement Squad” to call.

The other cancer case involved my next door neighbor, one of Canada’s best television journalists from the CBC, Wendy Mesley. Late in November, 2004, the day after the Grey Cup game, Wendy told me that she had just found out that she had breast cancer. It was quite a shock and out of respect for her privacy, I never mentioned it to anybody.

Wendy underwent several kinds of treatments including chemotherapy which caused her to lose all of her hair. Occasionally, I would ask her husband, Liam or her care giver, how she was doing and I was given to understand that it was a very checkered path. There would be good days and there would be bad days and nobody could really predict what would happen. Fortunately she survived.

The cancer experience left Wendy very bitter especially against the pharmaceutical companies. She felt that she could have received better treatments. There was even a television special to explain her experience.

Given what I would later experience with coronary heart disease, and how I managed to cure myself in spite of the doctors, I am inclined to agree with her. I’ll repeat what I said above: There are too many people in the health care industry making too much money from suffering and death. So long as the disease doesn’t strike them, they don’t care. If a coverup of a cure for coronary heart disease can happen, then so can a coverup for a cancer cure occur too.

More and more people are turning to “alternative medicine” instead of accepting what the doctors tell them. From now on, when I am prescribed anything I don’t know about, I research the Internet instead of mindlessly accepting what I am told. I have already rejected several other “medicines” that could have affected my heart negatively.

But the NHL and the other sports leagues do what the doctors tell them. They wear pink ribbons and participate in public events to raise awareness about cancer. The late Terry Fox, another celebrated cancer victim would be proud. But are they really doing anything significant about the disease itself? Given the corruption in the health care industry that I uncovered the hard way, it is highly questionable.

 

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