Pascal Dupuis Did NOT Have To Retire Part 1

While NHL fans are awaiting the outcome of the Conference Finals and whether or not there will be NHL expansion, I must find other topics of interest. One seemingly trivial topic that did not attract much notice was the retirement of Pittsburgh Penguin, Pascal Dupuis (above top left) due to recurring blood clots. Dupuis is also Pittsburgh’s choice this year for the Bill Masterton Trophy. But this story is not trivial and can affect every figure in sports, and everybody else all over the planet.

Blood clots are also significantly affecting the Penguins current opponents in the Stanley Cup Playoffs, the Tampa Bay Lightning. Star Lightning forward Steve Stamkos (above top right)  has not played a single playoff game since recovering from surgery for the removal of a blood clot in his neck. As for Dupuis, he has tried to come back several times but has finally given up for good. Too bad he – and the Penguins, the Lightning and the NHL – does not know the truth, that only an insider like myself found out – the hard way.

 
Blood clots are a form of coronary heart disease (sometimes popularly called “hardening of the arteries”). This disease is the worst killer in North America – even more than cancer – and probably in the world. Over 10,000 Canadians die each year. In the United States it is probably hideous Holocaust numbers. It can strike anyone (and mammals and birds) at any time of life. It has killed or maimed too many notable sports figures to count, Dupuis, Johnny Unitas, Ron Lancaster, Bobby Ackles, – and most tragically for hockey, top New York Rangers draft pick Alexei Cherepanov in 2008, aged only 19 (above bottom left).

Coronary heart disease can cause death and serious health problems in several ways. If too much heart plaque concentrates around the heart area, it can cause a heart attack, sometimes fatally. If the concentration occurs in the brain, the result is a stroke. Then there are the various “minor” health problems like Dupuis’s and Stamkos’s clots.

In 2008, I was diagnosed with coronary heart disease after various tests showed that I had a blockage of unknown size and unknown location somewhere around my heart. I was scheduled for an angiogram (where a long tube with a mini-camera is inserted into an artery to hunt for the blockage) two months later and given a box of nitroglycerin to carry at all times in case the worst should occur. Once the blockage was found I would probably be scheduled for some form of open heart surgery, probably a bypass or stent operation, if I was fortunate enough to live that long.

Fortunately I lived in the age of the Internet and was able to take action of my own. First I thought that since it was 2008, was the composition of heart plaque known? Through research on the Internet I discovered this was true. I then thought, “If the composition of heart plaque is known, why doesn’t somebody invent some kind of drug or remedy to remove it without anybody having to go through open heart surgery?” So on a whim I typed “stuff to remove heart plaque” into the Internet search engine and to my amazement, up came several websites claiming they had products to do just that.

I had two reactions; on one hand I had hope again and rejoiced because this was offering me an alternative to open heart surgery or death; on the other I was cynical, skeptical, and suspicious because no doctor had told me about such products and this might only be people telling me what I wanted to hear. After all, coronary heart disease is officially classified as “incurable”.

But the chance to be cured was too good to be ignored, especially when compared with the two alternatives, death or heart surgery. So I spent over a month doing research on the Internet about these products. There was a lot of hatred and scare tactics on the Internet, though significantly NOT by people who had used the product. I visited the companies’ websites, viewed forums by people who had used these products, found out possible side effects, learned whatever I could and in the end I asked myself what was the worst that could happen if I tried one of them.

There were four restrictions about taking this product and none applied to me. It was not recommended for children nor for pregnant women, and it was not recommended for people with either liver or kidney disease. The only side effect was diarrhea. So the worst that could happen to me was that I would stay the same, have a bad case of diarrhea, and waste $180 (including the price of shipping) plus another dollar to buy a jug of distilled water to mix the remedy. But what if it worked?

I have wasted money in worse ways so I decided to try one. It came from Minnesota and arrived by special courier four days later. It was a six week program, requiring me to take the remedy six times a day at different intervals, gradually being reduced to four times a day.

To make a long story short, I cynically took my six doses that first day and then retired to bed. I did not feel any better but when I woke up 4½ hours later, everything had changed. I now could feel blood flow around my heart that I could not feel before. It was 16½ hours after I had taken my first dose. And it was only now that I truly began to believe that this remedy was doing what it promised to do: remove heart plaque from my body.

Two weeks later was my angiogram and it confirmed what I believed; the tube with the camera could not find anything to operate on. I had beaten coronary heart disease without open heart surgery.   Eight years later I am still alive and have no more chest pains.

So what is this stuff and how does it work? To understand what had happened, people have to know two things; the difference between veins and arteries and capillaries; and the composition of heart plaque. The walls of veins have only two layers while arteries and capillaries have three. This is why most blockages occur in the latter.

Heart plaque is composed of two substances, cholesterol and minerals. If somebody were to pour a gallon of pure cholesterol down a completely clean artery, nothing would stick and everything would be converted into urine. But because humans, mammals, and birds eat, breathe, and absorb minerals, some of them stick to the walls of arteries and capillaries. Then when cholesterol is absorbed, it in turn sticks to the minerals – not to the walls of the blood vessels – forming heart plaque.

The remedy I took is called a chelation remedy (above bottom right) – chelation meaning to purify. In effect it is an acid. It goes into the circulatory system where it dissolves the bond between the minerals and the wall of the blood vessels and sweeps them away. Since the cholesterol has nothing more to stick to, it too gets swept away and everything gets safely converted into urine by the kidneys.

Chelation has been around since the 1950s, when it was used to remove toxic mineral buildup in miners. There are two ways of doing it, either buying it over the Internet like I did and being my own doctor, or (if a patient does not trust himself/herself) going to a special chelation clinic (there are lots of these clinics around the world) and getting the plaque removed under a doctor’s supervision. But this is more expensive. There are many videos about chelation on You Tube.

So Pascal Dupuis and Steve Stamkos could get rid of their blood clots by the chelation remedy and be playing again. Of course the plaque will return again over time but by taking the remedy at regular intervals for the rest of their lives, they will never get into the danger zone again. And chelation has another huge advantage over open heart surgery. Surgery only gets rid of the plaque around the heart area while the chelation remedy gets rid of it from the entire body. So not only are people protected from heart attacks, they are also protected from strokes in the brain and blood clots anywhere else.

Unfortunately in my case, while my angiogram confirmed I no longer had coronary heart disease, the first disease had caused a second disease, heart failure, which is damage to the heart itself. This occurred because the effort of my heart to pump the blood when the blood vessels were clogged strained the heart’s muscles. (There have been developments concerning this disease but that merits a separate article.) So if Dupuis were to be allowed to return, he would also have to be cleared for heart failure as well.

So if a cure for coronary heart disease exists why do not doctors prescribe it? Why do so few people know about it? Why are scare tactics being used to discourage people from trying it? The answer is in part 2.

Next: Why No Cure?

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s